Lil Nas X's 'Satan Shoes' Sell out in Less Than a Minute Amid 'Satanic Panic' Controversy

Lil Nas X's "Satan Shoes" sold out in under a minute when they became available on Monday, in spite of the controversy surrounding the release. The rapper released the Biblically-inspired music video for his new song "Montero (Call Me By Your Name)" last week. The accompanying sneakers feature a bronze pentagram, an inverted cross and a drop of real human blood.

Lil Nas X has dominated the headlines since Thursday when he released his new music video where he gives the devil himself a graphic lap dance. He also collaborated with New York City-based art collective MSCHF for a set of limited edition Nike Air Max 97 sneakers, with a design based on the video. MSCHF told CNN Style that the sneakers sold out in less than a minute when they became available. Over on Twitter, Lil Nas X boasted: "Y'all talked so much s— about these shoes just for them to sell out in literally less than one minute. [Laughing my a— off] y'all going out SAD!"

That tweet has since been deleted, and Nike has also taken pains to distance itself from the sneakers. In a statement emailed to CNN, the company said: "We do not have a relationship with Lil Nas or MSCHF. Nike did not design or release these shoes and we do not endorse them."

The shoes were extremely rare, with just 666 pairs sold. Still, each set was priced at $1,018, so the enormous sales are no small feat. The price is reportedly a reference to the Bible passage Luke 10:18, which reads: "I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven."

The shoes have inverted crosses printed on the tongues, brass pentagrams dangling from the laces and another pentagram printed on the soles on the inside. The bubble soles contain just over 2 fluid ounces of liquid cushion inside, and each one has reportedly been enhanced with "one drop" of human blood.

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The shoes are just a small part of the uproar raised by Lil Nas X's new music video. It shows a handful of CGI-heavy, Bible-inspired scenes, often including several versions of the rapper himself interacting with each other. In the last verse and chorus, he rides a stripper pole down to hell wearing only briefs and thigh-high boots, then gives the devil a lap dance.

Critics are accusing the rapper of promoting Satanism and intentionally trying to corrupt his young fans, while fans are praising the video as a triumph of unapologetic LGBTQ+ representation. Lil Nas X seems to agree with the latter, based on his commentary on Twitter in recent days.