Billie Eilish Didn't Shade Travis Scott After Stopping Concert to Help Fan

Multiple reports alleged Billie Eilish had criticized Travis Scott during her recent concert. However, sources tell PopCulture.com in an update that "there was no shade" directed at the rapper. The initial story from TMZ reported that during Eilish's "Happier Than Ever" tour, currently underway, the "Bad Guy" singer noticed a fan experiencing a health issue during her Atlanta concert. Eilish noticed the woman having trouble breathing and stopped the show until she was helped.

Eilish soon deduced that the woman who was having breathing issues needed an inhaler, so Eilish gave her the one that she had on stage. After it was clear that the woman would be fine, Eilish quipped, "I wait for people to be okay before I keep going," making some online believe it was a snipe at Scott, who had resumed his performance when 10 people were crushed to death at his Astroworld concert this past November after the crowd rushed the stage. However, according to the source, the remarks she made were not at all linked.

Eight of the ten victims were pronounced dead the night of the concert. The 9th victim, 22-year-old Bharti Shahani, was pronounced dead on Nov. 10. The 10th victim was 9-year-old Ezra Blount, who succumbed to his injuries on Nov. 14. The other victims are Jacob Jurinek, 21; John Hilgert, 14; Brianna Rodriguez, 16; Franco Patiño, 21; Axel Acosta, 21; Rudy Peña, 23; Madison Dubiski, 23; and Danish Baig, 27. Additionally, over 300 people were injured in the fray, with 25 requiring hospitalization.

Scott is now facing a $2 billion lawsuit. TMZ reports that attorney Thomas Henry is representing 280 plaintiffs and the lawsuit was filed against Scott, Drake, Live Nation, NRG Stadium, and others. The lawsuit alleges that fans were "incited into a frenzy" during Scott's performance, causing a deadly surge towards the stage.

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According to the lawsuit, festival management did not take the appropriate steps to assure the safety of concertgoers. "The Defendants stood to make an exorbitant amount of money of this event, yet they chose to cut corners, cut costs, and put the festival attendees at risk," the filing reads, explaining the asking sum of $2 billion.