Lori Loughlin 'Mentally Preparing' for Time in Prison

Lori Loughlin is reportedly "mentally preparing" for her upcoming prison sentence. According to PEOPLE, a source close to the actress shared details about her current state of mind, adding, "She wants to go in, do her time, and get out. She wants it to be as uneventful as possible, and she wants this to be a distant memory by 2021."

On May 22, Loughlin pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud, while her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud and one count of honest services wire and mail fraud. Both have been ordered to report to prison on Nov. 19. The couple was accused of paying $500,000 to Rick Singer and Key Worldwide Foundation so that their daughters Olivia Jade Giannulli, 20, and Isabella Rose Giannulli, 21, could designated recruits to the University of Southern California crew team. However, this was a false designation, as neither of them ever participated in the sport.

The couple had initially planned to fight the charges against them but eventually came to a plea agreement with prosecutors, which a judge approved on Aug. 21. Per the terms of the plea agreement, the 56-year-old Full House star has been sentenced to two months in jail, 150 hours of community service and a $150,000 fine. Her 57-year-old fashion designer husband was given five months in jail, 250 hours of community service and a $250,000 fine.

"She is going to set her jaw and do her time," the source added. "Of course, she’s dreading it, but she’s resigned that it’s the way to get this behind her. She’s already thinking about how 2021 will be better for her, and she’ll be able to move forward."

0comments

"There’s some humility there that people didn’t see before," the source went on to say. "She's going to learn what she can from the experience and hopefully become an even better person from this. She’s open to learning the lessons that she needs to learn."

In a statement delivered at her sentencing, Loughlin appeared remorseful for her actions, saying, "I made an awful decision. I went along with a plan to give my daughters an unfair advantage in the college admissions process. In doing so, I ignored my intuition and allowed myself to be swayed from my moral compass." She added, "I thought I was acting out of love for my children, but in reality, it only undermined and diminished my daughters’ abilities and accomplishments."