'Gold Rush' Season 10: Discovery Unveils Wild First Look Trailer (Exclusive)

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'Gold Rush' Season 10: Discovery Unveils Wild First Look Trailer (Exclusive)

Big Show Blasts WWE's Younger Stars

WWE’s Big Show recently sat down with Chris Jericho on the latter’s podcast, Talk is Jericho. It’s only been out a few days, but Big Show’s interview is already the lead candidate for 2017’s most brutally honest conversation in wrestling.

Already making headlines for bashing WWE creative, Big Show is making news again. This time, Show is targeting WWE's younger generation.

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Before blasting WWE's wave of new talent, Big Show drew some context by explaining how hard it was for him when he first arrived in WWE:

"There were so many different things going on, personally it attacked the hell out of me and it was very difficult to get over. It's one of those things you're getting your ass chewed out and you really don't understand why you're getting your ass chewed out and the last thing you can do is ask why, because then it'll expose what kind of an idiot you really are.”

If that was the volley, here’s the spike:

"These new kids don't really have this problem because they're catered to. They get everything explained to them. It gets broken down, they sit down, they watch videos. If they mess up, they get patted on the back... They can't take an ass chewing because they fold like aluminum foil.”

A harsh criticism from the WWE veteran and chances are, he’s right.

Wrestling has been evolving a rapid rate since about 2001. As a public traded company, WWE has a responsibility to keep things running smoothly, hence the PG Era.

Big Show’s critique of a softer generation comes from the gentrification of wrestling. The circumstances just aren't the same as they were when Big Show jumped from WCW to WWE. At that time WWE was in a fight for its life, typically on a weekly basis. The need for exceptional performance was at an all-time high.

Today, WWE finds itself on the cusp of its 2nd decade without an ounce of competition. Becuase there is no rabbit to chase, or lion to escape, it’s easy to imagine that WWE is pretty relaxed compared to the mid-90’s.

That said, wrestling doesn’t seem like a business where complacency can survive. So let’s hope that Big Show's opinion can positively affect WWE and its younger stars.

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