World Cup 2022: FIFA Bans Alcohol Sales at World Cup Stadiums in Qatar

FIFA just made a big decision when it comes to this year's World Cup. The organization announced that it has banned alcohol sales inside World Cup Stadiums during the event which begins on Sunday (Nov. 20). However, the sale of Bud Zero, a non-alcoholic beer, will be available for all the World Cup Stadiums in Qatar. 

"Following discussions between host country authorities and FIFA, a decision has been made to focus the sale of alcoholic beverages on the FIFA Fan Festival, other fan destinations and licensed venues, removing sales points of beer from Qatar's FIFA World Cup 2022 stadium perimeters," FIFA said in a statement. "Host country authorities and FIFA will continue to ensure that the stadiums and surrounding areas provide an enjoyable, respectful and pleasant experience for all fans. The tournament organizers appreciate AB InBev's understanding and continuous support to our joint commitment to cater for everyone during the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022."

According to Yahoo Sports, authorities in Qatar appear to have overruled FIFA which is soccer's global governing body and owner of the World Cup. FIFA, its longtime sponsor Budweiser and Qatar, the host nation of the World Cup, had an agreement that alcohol can be sold within the stadium compounds, around the perimeter of the areas, but not in concourses. Yahoo Sports also said that Qatari government officials began to push back last week, demanding that outdoor beer tents be moved to less visible locations. 

Public consumption of alcohol as well as public intoxication is illegal in Qatar which is located in Western Asia. Beer is sold almost exclusively at bars and restaurants in hotels as they are the only venues in the country that receive alcohol licenses. The Football Supporters Association (FSA), the national representative body for soccer fans in England and Wales shared thoughts on the decision.

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"Some fans like a beer at the match, and some don't, but the real issue is the last-minute U-turn which speaks to a wider problem – the total lack of communications and clarity from the organizing committee towards the supporters," the organization said in a statement. "If they can change their minds on this at a moment's notice, with no explanation, supporters will have understandable concerns about whether they will fulfill other promises relating to accommodation, transport or cultural issues."