Lyssa Chapman Posts Hard at Work Photo After Announcing Mission Against Human Trafficking

Lyssa Chapman, the daughter of Dog the Bounty Hunter star Duane "Dog" Chapman, picked a new cause to dedicate her time to — human sex trafficking. On Wednesday, she shared photos of herself hard at work researching the topic and revealed she has spoken to victims and their loved ones herself. In an interview with The Sun this week, Chapman said she joined forces with Dog's Most Wanted co-star Rainy Robinson to help reunite families with missing loved ones.

Chapman's Instagram post included a trio of photos of herself at her desk, combing over notes and researching on the web. "Spending all my time at my desk these days. Researching the inn’s and outs of [human sex trafficking], the [effects] on families, the horrible underbelly of an international pandemic that The Department of Defense calls the 'The world's fastest-growing crime,'" Chapman wrote. She has already spoken to mothers of missing children and can now see the "faces of loved ones, on missing posters defined only by their age, height, weight and what they were last seen wearing" whenever she closes her eyes.

The reality TV star said she noticed each case is unique. "I am hearing the stories from survivors, raw and unedited. The joy and freedom they so longed for is now a reality," she wrote, going on to call this effort her true calling. "Finally I can find redemption in this world, doing good that no one can deny me. Using every skill I have to help #SaveOurChildren and try give answers to families," she wrote. In the end, she directed her fans to Lost Never Forgotten, an organization dedicated to reuniting victims of human sex trafficking with their families.

In her interview with The Sun, Chapman said she and Robinson decided this was the best way to use the tracking skills they developed as bounty hunters. “We feel very passionately about this — we didn't choose this," Chapman explained. "This is choosing us. People are coming at us at an alarming rate where we have to do something, I can't ignore these babies in my inbox anymore."

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Robinson said people have been reaching out to them every day to ask for help. “And it comes to a point where we can't ignore these messages anymore. People are constantly reaching out, needing help and we are in a position to help," she said. The two were both shocked to see the statistics of human trafficking cases. It is estimated that just .04% of survivors of human trafficking cases are identified.

"We will literally do anything that we can do to help. When it comes to making phone calls, people will hang up on the police. They say, 'hi, we're looking for so-and-so' and they hang up the phone," Chapman told The Sun. "We can get farther than that sometimes because people respond when they have a celebrity in their inbox or we offer them a hundred bucks. They give up information. The cops can't do that. We can."