Reba McEntire Rescued From Old Building After Stairs Collapse

Reba McEntire had a close call this week when she and six other people — including her boyfriend, Rex Linn — were rescued by authorities from an old building in Oklahoma on Tuesday. The country music singer and sitcom star was touring a 100-year-old historic site in Atoka, Oklahoma, when its interior partially collapsed, TMZ reports.

The building was in the midst of renovations when the dilapidated stairs - that were scheduled to be replaced - crumbled, Emergency Management Director Travis Mullins told the news outlet. McEntire, Linn and the others on the tour with her were on the second floor of the building when the stairs collapsed, leaving them stuck and requiring an old-fashioned ladder rescue. Video shared on social media, which you can see below, shows firefighters leading her and others down through a window.

Luckily, there were no serious injuries as a result of the incident; one person was transported to a hospital with minor injuries and local reporter Lisanne Anderson reported for KTEN News that there were "just some bumps and bruises." McEntire has not publicly commented on the accident at the time of this writing.

It's been a strange few weeks for McEntire, who in August told fans that she and Linn were diagnosed with COVID-19 in July despite being vaccinated. Later that month, she said that she believes she didn't have COVID-19 after all, instead saying she had a different respiratory virus. "I did say that I had COVID but when I got tested my antibodies - it came up that I had not had COVID," she told Nancy O'Dell on Talk Shop Live.

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"I had my antibodies from my vaccine," McEntire continued. "So I had all the symptoms, so I was kinda probably - I did get tested, you know, the test that I had and it said that I had it but then the nurse that came and tested me for my antibodies said that I probably had the RSV virus." RSV, respiratory syncytial virus, is a common respiratory virus that usually causes mild, cold-like symptoms, according to the CDC.