Demi Lovato Reveals 'Triggering' Insult She Read About Herself That Made Her Want to 'Give Up' After Rehab

Demi Lovato is admitting that she almost gave up on her sobriety after she read that someone called her "morbidly obese" saying it was extremely "triggering" for her. According to Entertainment Tonight, a 2018 story referred to the singer as overweight and she says she wanted to "give up" after reading it. In an interview with Paper Magazine, Lovato says it was right after she got out of rehab.

"I think it was right after I got out of rehab in 2018. I saw an article somewhere that said I was morbidly obese," she told the outlet. "And that is the most triggering thing that you could possibly write about somebody with an eating disorder. That sucked, and I wanted to quit, I wanted to use, wanted to give up." Lovato has not only been very public with her journey to sobriety, but she's been very encouraging to her fans to seek help if they too are struggling with substance or alcohol abuse.

"And then I just realized that if I don't look at those things then they can't affect me," she continued. "So, I stopped looking and I just really try not to look at anything negative." However, despite the negativity, the 28-year-old still feels the need to be open about her life, her struggles and her journey. "I think the positive outweigh the negatives. I think that if they didn't, I wouldn't be doing this."

Lovato had a near-fatal overdose in 2018. Luckily, medical professionals were able to get to her in time to save her life. She now has a new docuseries out called Demi Lovato: Dancing With the Devil, where she opens up about her eating disorder and her struggle with drugs. She did confess that being so open can be very draining at times because her fans want to confide in her, and while she loves hearing their success stories, it does take a lot out of her.

"It's draining, yes, and it's hard," she explained. "There's reasons why my meet and greets have gotten a lot shorter over the years. More than a handful of people would tell you each time, 'You've saved my life,' or they would show me the cuts on their wrists. I know that they mean well, I know that they are confiding in me because they have no one else. But it does take a lot." Although it's a tough process for her, she does say that it's all worth it. "And I feel like the best way to not do that is by living my truth."