'That '70s Show': Why Tanya Roberts Really Left the Series

Tanya Roberts was largely known for her turn as Midge Pinciotti, the "hot mom" on the hit sitcom That 70's Show. Playing Donna's (Laura Prepon) mother, Roberts starred as one of the main characters in the comedy for three seasons until she abruptly left the show, sending fans into shock. Us Weekly reveals the real reason the star left the series was so she could take care of her ailing husband at the time, Barry Roberts. The actor/writer was best known for his film Legal Tender (1991), Barry and Tanya tied the knot in 1974 and remained together until he died in 2006.

As the Foreman family's neighbor, Roberts played a huge comedic role as she embarrassed her fictional daughter with her womanly wiles that further made Donna the butt of jokes among her male friends. Her character was eventually written out of the story by turning her into a disgruntled housewife and her marriage to Bob Pinciotti (Don Stark) ended in divorce. Roberts did return for a couple guest appearances in Season 6 and 7, but wouldn't become a regular again.

Roberts recently died in January, but her death also shocked fans and media. After reporting her death on Jan. 3, TMZ corrected their story admitting her agent shared news of her passing before she was actually dead. The star died on Jan. 5, following her abrupt collapse that was reportedly not COVID related. She was 65 years old.

There have been talks of a That '70s Show reboot for years, but some of the cast members have said they might not be on board for a new spin on the already classic show. Laura Prepon shared her thoughts on the possibility. "I don't think so," Prepon said. "I mean, look, I love that show. That show is like, it was my first thing, and I did it for eight years, and I love that show. I love that cast. I loved the crew, and I learned so much from our director, David Trainer, who directed every episode except for the pilot. He was like our father. That show was so special to me, but it's kind of like in a time capsule."

"For me personally, it was such a special time," she added. "It's kind of like, someone who has a great experience at college. You graduate, and I don't think you'd want to go back through college again and go through the stuff, but you really are like, 'Wow, what an experience that molded me in so many different ways.' And you know, hopefully you had a great experience doing it, but it's kind of like in this little capsule. I don't know. I don't think I would do that. But, I love that show and we're all still close and it's just amazing."