Jason Aldean Remembers Charlie Daniels as 'One of the Kindest People I Have Ever Met'

Jason Aldean is paying his respects to Charlie Daniels after the Country Music Hall of Famer died Monday of a hemorrhagic stroke at the age of 83. After Daniels' publicist announced Monday that the country legend had passed away that morning at the Summit Medical Center in Hermitage, Tennessee, the "Dirt Road Anthem" singer took to Twitter to share his memory of the late star.

Calling "The Devil Went Down to Georgia" artist "one of the nicest/kindest people," Aldean said he was heartbroken to learn of Daniels' death. "Thanks for the musical legacy u left all of us," he added, saying he would miss the icon now that he's passed. Alongside the tribute, Aldean added a photo of himself and Daniels chatting backstage before his death.

Aldean is just one of the many in country music honoring Daniels. Luke Bryan shared a photo of himself performing alongside Daniels on Twitter, saying he had just learned about the death of this "great man." He continued, "What a hero. A true patriot, Christian, and country music icon." Concluding by commending Daniels for his contributions both on and off stage, Bryan offered prayers to the singer-songwriter's family, writing, "God bless you Charlie Daniels."

NASCAR champion Darrell Waltrip also paid tribute to his longtime friend on social media. "I have a heavy heart today, one of my best friends and a country music legend has passed away, Charlie Daniels was a great guy, l loved him like so many others did, RIP my dear old friend!" Waltrip wrote on Monday afternoon.

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In addition to his work with the Charlie Daniels Band, the late music icon had a rich career prior to "Devil" hitting the top of the charts in 1979. He also played on three of Bob Dylan’s albums as a session musician, including Nashville Skyline, as well as on recordings for Ringo Starr and Leonard Cohen.

Later in his life, Daniels dedicated his life to charity, including working with veterans through The Journey Home Project, which he founded in 2014 with his manager, David Corlew. He told PopCulture.com in a 2019 interview of his passion for helping veterans, "There's some pretty unique problems involved. ...We're an extension of it more so than it being an extension of us because it's bigger than we are."