Chiefs' Laurent Duvernay-Tardiff's Scrubs Put in Pro Football Hall of Fame

Kansas City Chiefs guard Laurent Duvernay-Tardiff announced in late July that he would opt out of the 2020 NFL season. He said that he would utilize his doctorate in medicine while caring for his patients amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Now the Pro Football Hall of Fame is honoring the Super Bowl champion by putting his scrubs in Canton.

The Hall of Fame posted a photo across social media on Monday showing the newest addition to the iconic facility. The grey scrubs featured a Chiefs logo above the breast pocket. The mannequin also wore a facemask and a face shield. Duvernay-Tardif's lab coat rounded out the display.

"I am truly honored to receive this recognition from the Pro Football Hall of Fame. I accept this on my behalf but also on behalf of all frontline workers who have dedicated their lives to protect our communities. Thank you!" Duvernay-Tardif tweeted on Monday.

With the announcement that the guard's scrubs were now in the Hall of Fame, fans reacted with a few strong words for the league and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. They wanted to know if Duvernay-Tardif would now be allowed to put MD on his jersey after previously being denied. The Twitter users said that it was the perfect time considering that his medical career was now a permanent part of the Hallowed Halls.

"The Hall recognizes the great work DR. Tariff is doing yet the league will not bestow the honor by allowing him to place MD on his jersey. Good time to reconsider," one fan commented. Several others joined in the conversation and expressed similar opinions. They expressed a desire to see the league recognize the Super Bowl champion and his time off the field.

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"Given the worldwide sanitary crisis we are currently experiencing, the NFL and the NFLPA have agreed to significant health and safety protocols to protect the players," Duvernay-Tardif said in a July statement. "There is no doubt in my mind the Chiefs' medical staff have put together a strong plan to minimize the health risks associated with COVID-19, but some risks will remain."

"Being at the frontline during this offseason has given me a different perspective on this pandemic and the stress it puts on individuals and our healthcare system," Duvernay-Tardif continued. "I cannot allow myself to potentially transmit the virus in our communities simply to play the sport that I love. If I am to take risks, I will do it caring for patients."