Kip Moore Tells the Black Community 'I'm Sorry'

Kip Moore added his voice to the group of country artists speaking out about current events, issuing a message on Instagram on Monday that acted as a series of apologies. Moore first addressed the black community, writing that he was sorry that centuries-long protestations against oppression have largely been ignored. "To the black community...I’m Srry that you’ve screamed for so long about feeling oppressed and it’s fallin on deaf ears," he began. "You matter. I hear you, i see you, and I have nothing but love for you." The "Southpaw" singer next shared a thank-you to police offers, highlighting those who are doing their jobs "the right way."

"To the police officers all over... Im Srry that those of you doing the job the right way, always get lumped into the same category with the few doing it the wrong way," he wrote. "I’m thankful for you guys and know most of you have your heart in the right place. We should celebrate your bright days more." Moore concluded with a message to God, apologizing for the behavior of humans. "To God, I’m Srry that we’ve been here this long and continue to be terrible to each other. I’m sure your vision for us looked drastically different. I Hope we can work towards changing that now...Not soon, but now. #onelove."

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Moore accompanied his words with a video of black and white children playing together on a playground before the footage cut to Moore and two black friends playing basketball in the same park. At the end of the clip, the three men watched two of the children hug and tell each other, "Nice to meet you," as Moore said, "It’s a beautiful thing, how when kids are born they don’t see color. They don’t feel hate. It’s a really sad thing that we’ll teach them how to do both." The video ended with the hashtag #BetheChange displayed on the screen.

The post comes days after Moore released his latest album, Wild World, along with a documentary chronicling the weeks leading up to the project's release. Titled 7 Days at the Rock, the short film followed Moore as he spent time at his remote rock climbing facility, BedRock, in Red River Gorge, Kentucky.