Kanye West Defends 13th Amendment Comments in Confusing Clarification Attempt

Following his controversial comments on the 13th Amendment, Kanye West has now defended himself with a somewhat confusing clarification attempt.

TMZ caught up to the rapper on Monday morning and asked him if he could elaborate on his previous statement.

West began by saying that he simply wants to "open up the conversation" about the amendment. He then began to drop some facts about the writing of the constitution, as well as purported a theory that 16th U.S. president Abraham Lincoln may have actually been "black."

He eventually admitted that neither he nor the cameraman were "scholars," and promised that he would have a more prepared opinion when he appears on TMZ Live this week.

West's original comments on the amendment came after he performed on SNL on Saturday night, and reportedly went on a political rant from the stage at the end of the show.

"this represents good and America becoming whole again," West wrote in a tweet that featured a picture of him wearing a "Make America Great Again" hat. "We will no longer outsource to other countries. We build factories here in America and create jobs. We will provide jobs for all who are free from prisons as we abolish the 13th amendment. Message sent with love."

For reference, the 13th Amendment reads, "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction."

After his initial tweet, West followed up by tweeting two more times, in order to expand on his statement.

"the 13th Amendment is slavery in disguise meaning it never ended We are the solution that heals," the first tweet read.

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"not abolish but. let’s amend the 13th amendment," the rapper wroite in the second follow up. "We apply everyone’s opinions to our platform."

As he mentioned, West is scheduled to appear on TMZ Live this week to speak more in depth about his comments with Harvey Levin.