'Selling Sunset' Star Heather Rae Young Recalls Posing Nude for Playboy

Heather Rae Young admits she's not embarrassed about her former time as a Playboy Bunny. The Selling Sunset star tells The Sun, she looks back on her time fondly, and it's ultimately what helped jumpstart her real estate career. "It catapulted my career, it changed my life, it was the most defining moment in my life," she told the outlet. 

Young, who recently dropped her last name for El Moussa after marrying real estate reality TV personality Tarek El Moussa this year, is now a step-mom to two kids: Taylor and Brayden. "I'm still trying to figure out how I'm going to tell the kids I did Playboy," she tells the outlet.

After getting her start, she dabbled briefly in acting for four years, landing minor roles in various big pictures. Though, she found modelling was her ticket to better living. "Modelling and acting transitioned me into real estate. I've met a lot of contacts through my modelling/acting career — a lot of wealthy people, celebrities," she said. 

Using her connections, she managed to run up a stellar amount in sales within a short amount of time. "I channelled that into real estate and using my contacts. I sold over nine million dollars worth of real estate within my first four months," she reveals. "I don't regret anything I've ever done. I'm proud of my life. Everything I've done has got me to where I am today."

As for if she thinks Tarek's daughter Taylor might ever want to try the same route she took to reach fame, the real estate agent coyly deflected –– she says that's a topic her husband would be better suited to answer. "I'm sure Daddy would say no, but, um, you know, Taylor is such an entertainer. She is meant to be on TV. She filmed with me for Selling Sunset and she films with me and Tarek for Flipping 101. She'll absolutely be a model but not doing what I did," she said.

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Heather and Tarek appear in the fourth installment of the Netflix series Selling Sunset, and the newlywed somehow finds herself in some stewing drama at the Oppenheim Group. "Everything you see — all the drama, all the fighting — that's all real," she says. "A lot of people think, oh, maybe it's not because it is so catty and dramatic. But we're in a high-pressure industry, in a high-pressure job and it happens."

"Most of us are very supportive of each other, we try and lift each other up. There is obviously fighting but we're not mean for the sake of it. Mostly things tend to get sorted out after they get heated," she continued. "We're all very strong, independent women with our own views which can cause issues."