Eddie Murphy's 'SNL' Monologue Sparks Heated Response From Bill Cosby's Spokesperson

Eddie Murphy’s return to Saturday Night Live was a welcomed sight for many the show’s longtime viewers and of his fan base. HIs return, though, didn’t win everyone over. A spokesperson for Bill Cosby issued a statement stemming from his comments about the longtime television personality during his opening monologue, saying Murphy is a "Hollywood Slave."

"It is sad that Mr. Murphy would take this glorious moment of returning to SNL and make disparaging remarks against Mr. Cosby," Andrew Wyatt, Cosby's PR representative said in a statement obtained by ET. "One would think that Mr. Murphy was given his freedom to leave the plantation, so that he could make his own decisions; but he decided to sell himself back to being a Hollywood Slave. Stepin Fetchit plus cooning equals the destruction of Black Men in Hollywood. Remember, Mr. Murphy, that Bill Cosby became legendary because he used comedy to humanize all races, religions and genders; but your attacking Mr. Cosby helps you embark on just becoming click bait. Hopefully, you will be amenable to having a meeting of the minds conversation, in order to discuss how we can use our collective platforms to enhance Black people rather than bringing all of us down together."

So what exactly was said by Murphy that set this whole thing up? In his return, Murphy joked about his career path and where he is at compared to Cosby. He referenced that he may be "America's Dad" after all is said and done.

"My kids are pretty much my whole life now, but if you would have told me 30 years ago that I would be this boring, stay-at-home house dad and Bill Cosby would be in jail, even I would have taken that bet," he stated.

During his opening monologue, Murphy provided much old-school vibes as he brought out some of his former cast members, including Dave Chappelle, Tracy Morgan and Chris Rock.

0comments

Murphy made his return to SNL after 35 years following his role on the show during the 80s. During his prime, he headed some iconic roles on the series, including Buckwheat, Mr. Robinson and Gumby. He eventually made his way onto the big screen, landing roles in 48 Hrs, Trading Places, Coming to America and Beverly Hills Cop.

Murphy is set to appear in the sequel of Coming to America.