Strawberry Moon Lunar Eclipse 2020: Best Times to Watch Friday Night

A full moon will be taking place on Friday but not just any full moon; a "Strawberry Moon" is set to light the sky with a gorgeous, bright tone. With that, it will also bring a penumbral lunar eclipse. Its fruitful name comes from the short season for harvesting strawberries in the northeastern region of the United States and was named by the Algonquin tribes, according to NASA.

With that, the moon will not be pink or red as a strawberry necessarily, it only gets its name from the time of year in which it shows itself. As several will be able to witness the last full moon of spring, it will create an eclipse by sitting opposite of the sun and will pass through part of the partial shadow of Earth. While this is taking place on Friday, a full moon will appear for three days — from Thursday until Sunday morning. However, for those who live in the United States, the moon will not be visible to see until night time. Instead, it will be entirely apparent for those living in eastern Africa, southern Asia, Australia, and the Middle East. As for those living in America, the moon will be at its peak from 1:45 p.m ET to 5:04 p.m. ET according to Space.com. Visit timeanddate.com for the time in which your region will be able to witness the full moon.

While it may be called a "Strawberry Moon," the beautiful bright tone has also been called several names, including Mead Moon; Honey Moon; Rose Moon; Flower Moon; Hot Moon; Hoe Moon, and Planting Moon. The term "honeymoon" referring to the first month of marriage has a suspicion of being tied to this full moon because it's referred to as a "Honey Moon" because it's the "sweetest" moon.

While the moon may be fun to look at and carry several different names, it also brings tradition among of all different backgrounds. Buddhists refer to this specific full moon as Poson Paya because, in Sri Lanka, the Poson holiday highlights the introduction of Buddhism in 236 BCE. Those who are Hindu also celebrate this time of year because it's a time for married women to show their love for their husbands by wrapping a ceremonial thread around a banyan tree.

"My favorite time to watch the full moon is as it is rising over the eastern horizon. When the moon is low on the horizon, it allows you to capture the view with objects in the foreground, making the moon appear bigger," CNN meteorologist Judson Jones said. "Say you are in the city, and you're watching between a couple of buildings, or over the skyline, it will make it feel that much bigger and give it more impact."