Vin Scully's Wife Sandra Dead at 76

Sandra Scully, the wife of legendary Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully, died on Sunday night due to complications from ALS, the team announced. She was 76 years old. The couple was married for over 45 years.

"We are saddened to learn of the passing of Sandi Scully, the loving wife of Vin and a dear member of the Dodger family," Dodgers president and CEO Stan Kasten said in a team statement. "Sandi was Vin's biggest fan and was always there in loving support of him at Dodger Stadium until she began her battle with ALS. She was truly Vin's and the Scully family's rock, and she will be dearly missed."

Sandra and Vin got married in 1973 after Vin's first wife, Joan, died in 1972. She was in the booth for Vin's final broadcast at Dodgers Stadium in 2016. The Scully family is asking that donations be made to the Department of Neuromuscular Disease at UCLA/ALS Research in Sandra Scully's name. Sandra leaves behind a large family that includes six children, 21 grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

Vin Scully, 93, was the Dodgers' broadcaster for 67 years before retiring in 2016. During his time in the booth, Scully saw the franchise win six World Series titles, with the last one being in 1988. He is still close to the franchise as he narrated the documentary about the 2020 Dodgers, who won the World Series.

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"I don't mean to put anybody down," Scully told USA TODAY shortly before the World Series came to an end, "but when the series started, I thought the Dodgers would win in five (games). Not that I know anything, but my thought is, 'What's taking them so long?' That's probably a dumb thing to say, but I guess it's not so much the failings of the Dodgers, but it's a tribute to the Rays. They don't look very formidable on television, I tell you that. They don't look like a team that scores a lot of runs. You look at them, and they'll leave the bases loaded, or nobody out and runners on first and third and trying to steal home." Scully is considered one of the best baseball broadcasters of all time. His 67 years with the team is the longest tenure of any broadcaster with a single team in sports history.