Todd Chrisley Says 'God Is Working Overtime' With Sentencing Delay in Fraud Trial

Todd Chrisley seems to feel that the recent news concerning his fraud conviction is a sign that fortunes will soon be reversed and he will once again be considered innocent. According to The Blast, the latest episode of Chrisley Confessions focused on the verdict, the trial, and who he and his wife Julie blame for the trouble.

According to Chrisley, Mark Braddock is the person to blame for the crimes. He claims that Braddock allegedly admitted on the witness stand that he was out for "revenge" against Chrisley for firing him. This also includes allegations that he and Chrisley had an affair.

"Our attorney literally said, 'You created fake emails under Todd Chrisley's name,'" Chrisley said. "'You sent fake emails out to their insurance carriers to people they were doing business with, two people in the real estate world that Mr. Chrisley does business with,' and you lied on me. What you said was a lie. Is that not true?"

Chrisley then goes on to say that he knows he and his wife will walk out of this with their reputations intact. "I know that the truth will eventually rise to the top and I know that we will have survived the lies because God has put that in my spirit," Chrisley adds. "I'm filled with the Holy Spirit. I know and I have a peace that God is working overtime. Satan will never outwork God."

The message about God working "overtime" fits in with the surprising decision regarding their conviction and sentencing, the latter being delayed. The new date is now in November, right before the start of the holidays, with the decision coming as a result of a suit filed by their lawyer.

0comments

According to PEOPLE, the couple's lawyer filed a motion for a new trial and alleged that the case from the government was "presented and failed to correct false testimony from IRS Revenue Officer Betty Carter, who lied about the Chrisleys owing taxes for years when she knew no taxes were due."

"This testimony had the effect of falsely painting the Chrisleys as untruthful, likely to commit other forms of fraud, and evading the tax payments alleged in the indictment," the filing adds. Without a new trial or a surprising decision by the judge, the Chrisleys face 30 years in prison.