You Can Now Buy Buffalo Bill's House From 'Silence of the Lambs'

If you think the best way to spend the rest of 2020 is living in a house used by a fictional serial killer in one of the most acclaimed movies ever made, now is your chance. The Perryopolis, Pennsylvania home used by the murderer Buffalo Bill in The Silence of the Lambs is up for sale again. It was last sold in 2016, and PETA made a play for it in an attempt to turn it into a museum where visitors would wear the skins of animals.

The home is located at 8 Circle Street in Perryopolis and is up for sale for $298,500, reports CBS Pittsburgh. According to the Realtor.com listing, the home sits on a 1.76-acre plot of land along the Yough River. It is a 110-year-old house and still has many of the original features, including wallpaper and hardwood floors. The property also has a swimming pool and a detached garage with enough space for three cars.

When the home was put up for sale in 2016, PETA said it was interesting in buying the home to turn it into an empathy museum. Visitors would be allowed to wear animal skins to be reminded that all animals are made of flesh and bone. "We’re interested in the possibility of converting the home into an empathy museum for animals abused and killed so that others may wear their skins," the organization said at the time. "Although ‘Buffalo Bill’ is a fictional character, many (animal) victims today undergo similar experiences. Do you think that the house could be turned into a local museum that inspires visitors to practice compassion with every piece of clothing that they buy?"

In July 2016, former owners Scott and Barbara Lloyd found a new owner, who was a fan of the film, reports the Tribune-Review. Real estate agent Dianne Wilk said the property sold for $195,000. The new owner did not want his name revealed. The Lloyds bought the house in 1976 and decided to downsize.

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The house was used in The Silence of the Lambs, which hit theaters in 1991. The horror movie is considered by many to be the best of its genre and one of the greatest films ever made. It remains the only horror movie to win the Best Picture Oscar. It also won Oscars for Jodie Foster and Anthony Hopkins' performances. Jonathan Demme won Best Director and Ted Tally won Best Adapted Screenplay. It is based on Thomas Harris' novel of the same name and centers on a young FBI agent (Foster) working with serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Hopkins) to find another serial killer, Buffalo Bill (Ted Levine), who skins his female victims' corpses.