'Ma Rainey's Black Bottom': Watch the Trailer for Chadwick Boseman's Final Movie

A new trailer has been released for Ma Rainey's Black Bottom, Chadwick Boseman's final movie, and fans can watch it right now. The film is based on a play of the same name by August Wilson (Fences), and is centered around a pivotal recording session for legendary blues singer Ma Rainey, in 1927 Chicago. Rainey, was known as "Mother of the Blues," is played by Viola Davis, while Boseman plays a trumpeter named Levee.

The new trailer gives fans a glimpse of what they can expect from musical drama, which is not entirely biographical, but is based around Rainey's life. Boseman's Levee is clearly a man with high hopes and big dreams, as evident when he says, "I'm gonna get me a band and make some records. I know how to plat real music." While tensions run high, between Levee's gusto and Rainey's stage presence the two incredibly talents musicians — along with the rest of the band — spark a fire that has continued to burn for decades. Fans will finally be able to see the film when it is released on Netflix, and in select theaters, on Dec. 18.

In addition to Davis and Boseman, Ma Rainey's Black Bottom also stars Colman Domingo (Fear the Walking Dead), Glynn Turman (House of Lies), Michael Potts (True Detective), Taylour Paige (White Boy Rick) and Dusan Brown (42). The film was directed by George C. Wolfe (The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks), from a screenplay by Ruben Santiago-Hudson, who is an actor best known for his role of Captain Roy Montgomery from 2009 to 2011 on ABC's Castle. The film is produced by Todd Black, Denzel Washington and Dany Wolf.

Ma Rainey's Black Bottom marks Boseman's final film performance, as he died on Aug. 28 after a long fight with colon cancer. "A true fighter, Chadwick persevered through it all, and brought you many of the films you have come to love so much," read a statement from Boseman's family. "From Marshall to Da 5 Bloods, August Wilson’s Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom and several more - all were filmed during and between countless surgeries and chemotherapy. It was the honor of his career to bring King T’Challa to life in Black Panther."