Helen McCrory, 'Harry Potter' Star, Dies at 52, According to Husband Damian Lewis

Actress Helen McCroy, known for her roles in Harry Potter and Peaky Blinders, has died at the age of 52. Her husband and fellow actor Damian Lewis took to his Twitter page to announce the heartbreaking news that she had lost her battle with cancer. In a Twitter post, he noted that his wife was surrounded by love and that she lived "fearlessly."

"I'm heartbroken to announce that after an heroic battle with cancer, the beautiful and mighty woman that is Helen McCrory has died peacefully at home, surrounded by a wave of love from friends and family," he shared. "She died as she lived. Fearlessly. God we love her and know how lucky we are to have had her in our lives. She blazed so brightly. Go no, Little One, into the air, and thank you."

Several fans flooded in to comment and send their love to Lewis and his family during this hard time. "Helen McCrory was just so fantastic in so many roles," one person wrote before noting some of their favorite roles the actress has played over the years. "Narcissa in HP, Cherie Blair in The Queen, Aunt Polly in Peaky Blinders. For me, her performance in Quiz last year as Sonia th defence barrister, stole the whole show. What a huge loss." Someone else said, "Sending lots of love to you and your family, RIP Helen."

Fellow actor Mathew Baynton took to the comment section as well to share how much he loved working with her through the years. "I'm so sorry, Damian. She was just wonderful. I feel so lucky to have had the chance to meet and work with her. She was so brilliant, fun and supportive. I'll never forget filming those scenes with her."

McCroy was well known for playing Narcissa Malfoy, the wife of Lucius Malfoy and mother of Draco Malfoy, in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 and Part 2. She was also famous for her role as Aunt Polly in Peaky Blinders, telling the BBC in 2014 that Polly was "the brains with Tommy behind the family" who showed "the difference" in how to rule. "One from a male point of view, which is much more physical and violent and threatening, and one from a female point of view, which is just as physically violent and threatening, but is also psychological," she added.