Dr. Amie Harwick's Brother Demands Public Apology From Wendy Williams Following Her 'Price Is Right' Joke

Dr. Amie Harwick's brother, Chris Harwick, is speaking out after Wendy Williams seemingly joked about his sister's death during Monday's episode of her namesake talk show. Speaking to Fox News on Wednesday, Chris demanded an apology from Williams over her "extremely distasteful" remarks, in which she said the famous The Price Is Right catchphrase while discussing Harwick's murder, believed to have been pushed from a third story balcony in a domestic violence incident.

"Domestic violence is something no one should be joking about," Chris told the outlet.
This is a difficult time for my family and for Wendy Williams to make light of this tragedy is very upsetting to us and extremely distasteful."

"My sister worked tirelessly for domestic violence victims and women's rights," he continued. "Wendy Williams should apologize publicly to my family for her comment."

Harwick was found unresponsive and suffering from injuries "consistent with a fall" beneath a third story balcony at her home after police received calls of a screaming woman. When they arrived at the scene, they discovered evidence of a forced entry and a struggle, and her former boyfriend, Gareth Pursehouse was arrested. He was charged with her murder on Wednesday.

Discussing her death on The Wendy Williams Show Monday, Williams, after explaining the circumstances surrounding Harwick's death, said, "Come on down," while tilting her head up and then down in reference to the Los Angeles therapist's fall. The mostly audience remained silent.

Williams' remarks immediately sparked backlash, with Jack Osbourne joining hundreds of others on social media criticizing the talk show host.

"Hey[Wendy Williams], Amie was a friend," he wrote. "How dare you be so rude and shallow to make a 'joke' out of something that is not funny in the slightest. She was tragically murdered, yet you somehow tried to make light of that. Shame on you. Smh."

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The comments have also resulted in newfound support of Williams being removed from air. Several new Change.org petitions have been created, with one such petition stating that allowing Williams to remain on TV "not only legitimizes the trivialization of domestic violence but helps perpetuate the idea that violence against women is both socially acceptable and open to jokes if done for a talk shows or entertainment ratings."

Williams, who has faced a number of controversies in the past, has not yet responded to the backlash.