Kevin Hart: Extortion Charges Dropped Against Former Associate Amid Lawsuit Drama

Kevin Hart has faced a lot of trials and stress over the past month. Not only is the Jumanji star and comedian struggling to get back on his feet following a car accident that left him with major back injuries, but he also saw his infidelity return to the spotlight due to a lawsuit filed by the woman involved.

While that case has been dismissed for the moment, with Monica Sabbag having till the end of September to amend the complaint, and a potential lawsuit over his accident is still looming, the drama is not finished for Hart.

According to TMZ, the comedian's former associate J.T. Jackson is no longer facing felony extortion charges related to Hart's sex tape and infidelity scandal. While Jackson still faces other charges, TMZ reports that the L.A. County D.A. couldn't see the extortion charge sticking in court because Jackson never made specific fiscal demands of Hart or his representatives.

TMZ adds that Jackson did make some demands on "various websites and blogs," but there was never a direct demand for payment made to Hart.

Jackson did make a demand for money on Hart's Instagram according to TMZ, writing "Give me $5 million or I'm releasing the video." This came only after the comedian publicly confirmed the sex tape and cheating, defusing any attempted extortion in the eyes of the law.

Jackson still faces two counts of unauthorized use of personal identifying information and attempted concealing and sale of stolen property, all still felonies according to TMZ.

Hart has denied any knowledge of the recording and apologized publicly for his infidelity in September 2017. Jackson was arrested in May 2018 for allegedly trying to force Hart to pay to keep the sex tape private, while the lawsuit filed in recent weeks by Sabbag alleges that both Jackson and Hart both intentionally set out to record the sexual encounter.

0comments

At the same time, Hart is still working to recover from his accident injuries. The comedian returned home on Sept. 20 and claimed he is shocked to be alive. Hart was hospitalized for 10 days and entered a live-in rehab facility immediately upon his release. This was meant to provide an "intense" physical therapy regimen that would last a week before he returned home.

He still faces a potential lawsuit from the accident on top of all of these woes, with the driver and passenger in Hart's vehicle suing over the lack of safety features in the 1970 Plymouth Barracuda. Hart could also sue the driver during the accident.