Woman Jumps From Walt Disney World Resort, Authorities Say

Police are investigating after a woman fell to her death from Disney’s Contemporary Resort in Walt Disney World Wednesday afternoon in what is believed to have been an apparent suicide. According to WESH 2, officials with the Orange County Sheriff’s Office were called to the scene at around 4 p.m. ET after several bystanders reported witnessing a woman jump from the building. Those in the area reported a heavy police presence, with emergency vehicles blocking roadways and transportation in and around the Magic Kingdom section of the park temporarily suspended.

Upon arrival, Ashley Carter of My News 13 reported that authorities found the woman "unresponsive" at the resort, which is located near Magic Kingdon. She was later pronounced dead. At this time, the sheriff’s office "believes it was a suicide."

"On 3/4/2020 at about 4pm, deputies responded to the Contemporary Resort after a call came in about someone who may have jumped off the building. Deputies and the Reedy Creek Improvement District responded and found a female, unresponsive, who was later pronounced deceased on the scene," the Orange County Sheriff's Office confirmed in a statement, ComicBook.com reports. "At this time, we believe this was a suicide, and we have no other information to release."

Disney Parks has not yet commented on the incident.

At this time, no further information, including the woman’s identity, is available. The investigation is ongoing.

The incident is just the latest to take place at the Contemporary Resort. In 2016, a guest jumped from the central A-frame tower of the resort in what was later determined to be a suicide, the Inquistr reported at the time. In 2005, someone on the Disney forum on WDW Magic recalled being questioned by sheriff’s deputies after a similar incident had occurred.

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Elsewhere at Walt Disney World, numerous other deaths have occurred as a result of suicide, heart attacks, accidents on attractions, and other scenarios.

If you or someone you know is contemplating suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.