'True Detective' Adds 'Justice League' Star Ray Fisher to Season 3

Cyborg is joining True Detective.

HBO has announced the casting of Justice League actor Ray Fisher — who played the chrome-covered superhero last fall — as a series regular in the upcoming third season of the hit detective drama.

According to Entertainment Weekly, Michael Greyeyes (Fear the Walking Dead), Jon Tenney (The Closer) and Rhys Wakefield also joined the cast in recurring roles. The cast will be led by Mahershala Ali, Carmen Ejogo and Stephen Dorff. Godless star Scoot McNairy and Mamie Gumer will also appear on the series.

The third season is set to follow the story of a gruesome crime in the heart of the Ozarks and a mystery that deepens over decades and plays out in three separate time periods.

Ali will play the lead role of Wayne Hays, a state police detective from northwest Arkansas. Fisher will play Freddy Burns, Deadline reports, Wayne's son. Ejogo will play a school teacher named Amelia Reardon, who as some connection to two missing children.

McNairy will play Tom, a father who suffers a terrible loss which ties his fate to that of two state police detectives over ten years. Dorff will be playing Roland West, an Arkansas State Investigator. Along with his partner, West "has his life and career influenced over three decades by a baffling crime."

Wakefield, Greyeyes and Tenney will play recurring characters Henry Hays, Brett Woodard and Alan Jones, respectively, with no additional information provided about them.

True Detective season three is being shot under the working title, "Outlaws." Ultimately, with as secretive as HBO is about the True Detective series, this working title offers little clues about the new storyline, but is certainly intriguing.

The first season of True Detective is considered by some to be among the best seasons of television ever, but the second was much more divisive and not critically well-received.

Prior to the network officially greenlighting the new season, Casey Bloys, the president of programming for HBO, had been vocal about wanting to bring the show back, and to even have the series creator, Nic Pizzolatto, remain involved.

In an interview last year, Bloys said, "We're open to someone else writing it with Nic supervising it; it's a really valuable franchise for us. It's not dead; I'm just not sure we have the right take for a third season — yet."

With as much progress as they've made on it over the last several months, it seems like they've finally found the "right take."