'Bachelorette' Suitor Lincoln Adim Convicted of Indecent Assault and Battery

Lincoln Adim, a contestant on Becca Kufrin's season of The Bachelorette, was convicted of indecent assault and battery on May 21, just days before the show premiered.

The Suffolk County District Attorney's office told former Bachelor contestant Ashley Spivey that Adim, who has not yet been eliminated through episode 4, groped and assaulted an "adult female" in May 2016 — a full two years before The Bachelorette aired — and was ultimately given two years probation.

"Mr. Adim was convicted on May 21, 2018 of indecent assault and battery for groping and assaulting an adult female on a harbor cruise ship early on May 30, 2016. He was sentenced to one year in a house of correction, with that term suspended for a two-year probationary period," the attorney's office stated, adding that should Adim break his probation, he could be sentenced to jail.

"The judge ordered him to stay away from the victim and attend three Alcoholics Anonymous meetings per week during those two years. If he complies with the judge's orders, he will not have to serve out his term, but if he fails to comply with those orders or re-offends, he could be ordered to serve out the year behind bars."

Spivey wrote on Twitter Wednesday that she was disappointed in ABC and The Bachelor for allowing Adim on the show.

"I am honestly horrified that Lincoln, who was charged with indecent assault and battery, was allowed to go on the show. I do not understand how a serious crime like this was missed during background checks," Spivey wrote.

She added that she does not believe the network allowed Adim on the show for "drama purposes," and said that she thinks it simply "dropped the ball" on proper background checks.

"Let me be clear that I do not think production would ever allow this for drama purposes. I really think it is a huge problem for whoever does the background checks into the contestants," she wrote.

It's not clear if Adim is a registered sex offender, although a blanket statement on Boston-based attorney Stephen Neyman's website says that he may have to register, TV Guide reports.

Last month, another Bachelorette contestant on Kufrin's season 14, Garrett Yrigoyen, released a lengthy apology after his social media activity made headlines in regards to offensive posts that he had "liked."

Spivey outed his social media activity on the Reality Steve podcast, saying she received the screenshots from an anonymous Instagram account.

“To those who I have hurt and offended: This is all new to me. I went on the Bachelorette for the adventure and possibility of falling in love, not fame,” said Yrigoyen.

“I did not know what to expect once the show aired. I am sorry to those who I offended, and I also take full responsibility for my ‘likes’ on Instagram that were hurtful and offensive,” he continued. “garret_yrigs12 was my former Instagram handle and I decided to take it down and start fresh because I have learned an extremely valuable lesson and am taking steps to grow, become more educated, and be a better version of myself. I am not perfect, and I will never be anywhere close, but now I will always be more informed and aware of what I am liking and supporting, not just on Instagram, but in life.”

2comments

Yrigoyen became the talk of Bachelor Nation after liking offensive posts on Instagram that mocked the transgender community, a Parkland school shooting survivor, undocumented immigrants and more.

“I am not the negative labels people are associating me with. For those who do know me, I am a sincere, genuine, loving, light-hearted, open-minded and non-judgemental individual. I like to make new friends with anyone I meet and want everyone to find their happiness. I love to laugh often and enjoy seeing others do the same. I hope that some day you can get to know the real me and the man that I am,” he wrote, in part.