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Exclusive: 'Deadliest Catch' Captain Jake Anderson Recounts 'Scary' Experience After Loss of the Destination

Twins Featured on 'The Doctors' Found Dead in Apparent Suicide Pact

Twin sisters who once appeared on The Doctors have been found dead in what authorities believe was a suicide pact.

The Gazette reports that Sara and Amanda Eldritch, 33, were found dead in a vehicle near Royal Gorge Bridge and Park in Fremont County, Colorado, on Friday.

Both women were found shot to death, with suicide being the believed cause of death. No other details on their deaths are yet known.

"After further investigation and results from the autopsy," Fremont County Sheriff's Office said in a release. "This appears to be an isolated incident, and there is no threat to the public."

The Eldritch sisters were featured on The Doctors in March 2017 in a segment titled "Twins Imprisoned by their OCD," which is viewable below.

In the segment, both sisters detail their lifelong struggles with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

As children, it would take an hour to get their shoes on and tied in a certain way. As teenagers, they began bizarre cleaning customs, such as extremely long hand-washings and showers. Those showers escalated to be as long as 10 hours, making it nearly impossible for the women to have healthy social lives.

In the segment, the sisters make some troubling remarks that are chilling now that their fates have been revealed.

"By the end of our late 20s, we just kind of gave up on our lives entirely," one of the sisters said.

"They would tell me there is no reason to live.' If this is as good as it gets, if this is what our life will look like forever, there's no need to live,'"mother Kathy Eldritch recalled.

However, the women's lives changed drastically after they underwent a deep brain stimulation surgery in 2015. The procedure, which was typically done on patients with Parkinson's disease or essential tremor, involved sending electrodes through the women's brains.

After a while, the women said that they had major improvements and had new outlooks on life.

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"Thinking back to how I used to be, it seems like there was a different person that was in my body," Amanda said.

In addition to profiling their remarkable recoveries for the show, they also attempted to overcome their problem with separation anxiety, being as they had grown accustomed to always being with one another.