Go out Guilt-Free With These Top Wines for Weight Loss

Losing weight takes a huge amount of resolve and persistence, but it's especially hard for those of us who love to indulge in a glass of wine or two. Having trouble cutting out that summertime Rosé or skipping girls' night at the local wine bar? Here are a few winsome wines that won't crash your diet.

Red Muscadine

A study from Oregon State University found that red muscadine grapes contain higher levels of ellagic acid, a substance that can help aid weight loss and manage related conditions such as fatty liver. Similarly, Oak-aged wines have higher levels of ellagic acid (ellagitannin) depending on how long they've been aged for (the longer, the better).

Pinot Noir

It's not just our favorite faux-pop song—it's also one of our favorite wines for losing weight. Pinot Noir has been shown to have the highest levels of resveratrol, which can be great for blasting fat.

Chardonnay

Chardonnay clocks in with an average of fewer calories and less sugar than the above reds, making it a doubly smart choice for weight-conscious tipplers. White wines like Chardonnay average 85 calories, 2.6 carbs, and one gram of sugar, according to Tanya Zuckerbrot, R.D—less than many other indulgences we can think of. Not big on Chardonnay? Riesling, white zinfandel, and sauvignon blanc are also approved.

Rosé

Good news for summer day drinking—Rosé is on the approved list. As it turns out, this wine is both light in color and light on your waistline, owing to its dry profile and low sugar content. Zuckerbrot notes that red wines like Rosé, merlot and pinot noir average about 88 calories with less than three grams of carbs and one gram of sugar, which is just a bit higher than the approved whites.

With any of these choices, be sure your portion size is on-point. Anyone trying to watch their weight should stick to only one glass (5 oz.) per day, or your label-reading will be for naught. Be wary of oversize or deceptive glasses when contemplating your pour—these can cloud your perception of how much you're really imbibing.